Composers in Kannada other than Purandara Dasa

Carnatic composers (other than performing vidwans)
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srikant1987
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#1

Post by srikant1987 » 14 Jun 2009, 09:09

I'm particularly keen on knowing composers from Trinity era or later, because older compositions tend to be retuned by others. Lyrics, meanings and legal recordings of their Kannada (since they might've composed in multiple languages) songs would be welcome too.
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vs_manjunath
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#2

Post by vs_manjunath » 15 Jun 2009, 14:56

HMB as a court musician @ Mysore Palace is supposed to have composed 108 songs on Devi.
The presiding deity @Chamundi hills is Chamundeshwari. Many of these songs are in Kannada language. BhuvanEswariya( Mohana Kalyani) is a typical example. I can list out all the Kannda songs of HMB, it may take some time.

Mysore Vasudevachar; HH JayaChamaraja Wodeyar;
Mysore Sadashiva Rao; Veene Sheshanna;Veena Venkatgiriyappa; Bidaram Krishnappa;Mysore Chowdaiyya; were all composers. The compositions may not be in Kannada.
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srikant1987
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#3

Post by srikant1987 » 15 Jun 2009, 20:33

vs_manjunath wrote:I can list out all the Kannda songs of HMB, it may take some time.
Please! :)
vs_manjunath wrote:Mysore Vasudevachar; HH JayaChamaraja Wodeyar;
Mysore Sadashiva Rao; Veene Sheshanna;Veena Venkatgiriyappa; Bidaram Krishnappa;Mysore Chowdaiyya; were all composers. The compositions may not be in Kannada.
This is very curious, actually. Like Telugu, Kannada is also a language all words end in vowels. But while people rave about Telugu's musicality, and so many Carnatic composers whose mother tongue wasn't Telugu have composed in it, even some Kannadiga composers seem to have adopted another language for (most of?) their compositions.

Another thing is when Kannada and Telugu borrow an akArAnta Sanskrit word, Kannada leaves the akAra ending unaltered (retains it), but Telugu adds a -mu (or -du in case of masculine gender) to make it ukArAnta. Isn't akAra generally favoured in Carnatic music owing to its "open-throated" quality?
Last edited by srikant1987 on 16 Jun 2009, 06:10, edited 1 time in total.
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keerthi
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#4

Post by keerthi » 15 Jun 2009, 22:26

srikant1987 wrote:
Another thing is when Kannada and Telugu borrow an akArAnta Sanskrit word, Kannada leaves the akAra, but Telugu adds a -mu to make it ukArAnta. Isn't akAra generally favoured in Carnatic music owing to its "open-throated" quality?

can you give an example of kannaDa leaving out the akAra in an akArAnta..

also telugu adds a -mu only to neuter gender akAranta words.. masculine akAranta-s are suffixed with a -du..
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rajeshnat
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#5

Post by rajeshnat » 15 Jun 2009, 22:42

There is a thread for almost for each of the composer that manjunAth mentioned, it would be better if each of the composer is talked in that thread so that information gets collated in one nice placeholder.Let us not mix up all composers of kannada in one thread.
Last edited by rajeshnat on 15 Jun 2009, 22:42, edited 1 time in total.
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srikant1987
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#6

Post by srikant1987 » 16 Jun 2009, 06:08

@ rajeshnat

In these threads, because a majority of their compositions are in some other language, the general emphasis will shift to compositions in that language by sheer probability. I wanted a thread where their Kannada compositions are discussed.
keerthi wrote:can you give an example of kannaDa leaving out the akAra in an akArAnta..
Sorry, I meant it retains the akAra, and that becomes a longer akAra in fact. For example, akAra itself would remain akAra in Kannada (and the final -a is elongated, almost an A, which is even more open-throated), but in Telugu it would become akAramu, an ukArAnta word.
keerthi wrote:also telugu adds a -mu only to neuter gender akAranta words.. masculine akAranta-s are suffixed with a -du..
It still becomes ukArAnta. Further, the -a is also changed to -u. For example rAma -> rAmuDu rather than rAmaDu. And of course, in sambOdhana, it is rAma or rAmayya only.
Last edited by srikant1987 on 16 Jun 2009, 06:14, edited 1 time in total.
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keerthi
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#7

Post by keerthi » 16 Jun 2009, 13:39

srikant1987 wrote: It still becomes ukArAnta. Further, the -a is also changed to -u. For example rAma -> rAmuDu rather than rAmaDu. And of course, in sambOdhana, it is rAma or rAmayya only.
an interesting exception is sura.. I have heard many andhra-s sing its plural as suralu. and not surulu..
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srikant1987
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#8

Post by srikant1987 » 16 Jun 2009, 13:43

What does sura mean?

A word like pAda becomes pAdamu and pAdamulu in Trinity era Telugu. It becomes pAdam and pAdAllu in present-day Telugu. It's possible they're applying conventions of modern Telugu (which they're accustomed to) to songs.
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keerthi
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#9

Post by keerthi » 16 Jun 2009, 13:45

The dAsa-kuTa composers have contributed a big corpus of music; and some of the songs, it is believed have retained the original tunes.. This has been verified by the fact that different paTAntara-s all sing it in the same way..

There were composers like shEShaNNA, surapura AnandadAsa, a contemporary of the former who have used kannaDa.. javali-s in kannada of bangalore chandrashekharaiah, pattAbhirAmaiah are also known..
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