Balamuralikrishna

Carnatic Musicians
Post Reply
K Nagarajan
Posts: 66
Joined: 09 Jul 2015, 22:19

#176 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by K Nagarajan » 04 Dec 2015, 20:23

Thanks for the link.

I got the experience of attending the concert in person.

Mohana raga alapana ends abruptly but even to have the concert this far and
that too in the video format is itself very great.

Thanks once again.
0 x

CRama
Posts: 1935
Joined: 18 Nov 2009, 16:58
x 1
x 5

#177 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by CRama » 05 Dec 2015, 20:48

thanks varsha. Excellent concert and audio and video well presented.Is the rest of Mohanam available.
0 x

varsha
Posts: 1950
Joined: 24 Aug 2011, 15:06
x 5

#178 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by varsha » 05 Dec 2015, 21:00

Unfortunately No .
0 x

Aditto
Posts: 306
Joined: 20 May 2008, 20:31
Location: Hyderabad

#179 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Aditto » 20 Dec 2015, 00:20

Varsha ji,

Do we have janani ninuvina in Reetigowla by BMK?
0 x

sweetsong
Posts: 395
Joined: 29 Nov 2009, 16:48
x 1

#180 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by sweetsong » 18 Mar 2016, 20:19

A lecture from Doordarshan in 1989
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ccGhf4Y-cw
0 x

sweetsong
Posts: 395
Joined: 29 Nov 2009, 16:48
x 1

#181 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by sweetsong » 18 Mar 2016, 20:20

0 x

Aditto
Posts: 306
Joined: 20 May 2008, 20:31
Location: Hyderabad

#182 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Aditto » 20 Mar 2016, 10:25


Thanks a lot sweetsong. Thanks a lot :)
0 x

sweetsong
Posts: 395
Joined: 29 Nov 2009, 16:48
x 1

#183 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by sweetsong » 20 Mar 2016, 16:33

You are welcome :)

Here is a rare video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZZhYEdpYrw
0 x

isramesh
Posts: 71
Joined: 03 Feb 2010, 10:22
Location: Hyderabad

#184 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by isramesh » 20 Mar 2016, 21:29

sweetsong wrote:You are welcome :)

Here is a rare video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZZhYEdpYrw
Thanks for the rare gem. By the way YouTube link for janani ninuvuna is not working.
0 x

Vinay
Posts: 33
Joined: 16 Apr 2009, 16:06
Location: Kerala/Manipal

#185 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Vinay » 18 May 2016, 18:34

isramesh wrote:
sweetsong wrote:You are welcome :)

Here is a rare video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZZhYEdpYrw
Thanks for the rare gem. By the way YouTube link for janani ninuvuna is not working.
Here you go: https://youtu.be/pMHK8GPj4FY?t=29m18s, Janani Ninnuvina as it should be sung!
0 x

sweetsong
Posts: 395
Joined: 29 Nov 2009, 16:48
x 1

#186 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by sweetsong » 14 Jun 2016, 00:24

0 x

vsarmaiitm
Posts: 175
Joined: 18 Mar 2006, 10:35

#187 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by vsarmaiitm » 06 Jul 2016, 11:16

The maestro's 86th birthday today. Wishing the maestro the best of health and long life
A great piece in Hamsageethe
https://youtu.be/0GlkQWZAv7g
0 x

Rsachi
Posts: 4979
Joined: 31 Aug 2009, 13:54
Location: Bangalore
x 3

#188 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Rsachi » 06 Jul 2016, 11:31

Sir, thanks for posting this. Many of us believe it is the greatest movie made depicting the life of a Carnatic musician. Directed by G. V. iyer, based on a novel of Tara su, it shows the life and time for a Carnatic musician in old Mysore state. Anant Nag and BMK have simply excelled in the movie. This scene is the last and climactic moment. I daresay BMK has given us many a feast in Bhairavi and even better than this one in his incomparable musical career.

One turns nostalgic and feels alas, such aesthetic moments are for ever lost to us in this day and age of 8 track Dolby DTS Imax movies, and Rahmanisation of music! As Pope said, "the moving finger writes...."
0 x

rshankar
Posts: 12702
Joined: 02 Feb 2010, 22:26
x 14
x 5

#189 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by rshankar » 06 Jul 2016, 22:55

RSachi - you forgot Smt. MLV's lovely singing in the movie as well, and the dancing....
0 x

Rsachi
Posts: 4979
Joined: 31 Aug 2009, 13:54
Location: Bangalore
x 3

#190 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Rsachi » 06 Jul 2016, 23:32

Yes, Ravi, of course, that young dancer who danced to MLV's singing was a girl with name Jayalakshmi Eshwar. We went and met her! She was a product of Kalakshetra and lived then in Bangalore (in 1970s).

Watch this here:
https://youtu.be/79_52-DNDTU
0 x

rshankar
Posts: 12702
Joined: 02 Feb 2010, 22:26
x 14
x 5

#191 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by rshankar » 07 Jul 2016, 03:27

I have watched that clip. It's interesting that they had to show the heroine winning that encounter - she sucked as a dancer!
I think Jayalakshmi Eashwar moved to New Delhi later on.
I do remember thinking that it was one oddity in an otherwise accurate historical movie - to have used a style of bharatanatyam that would not have existed during the times this movie was set in!
0 x

Rsachi
Posts: 4979
Joined: 31 Aug 2009, 13:54
Location: Bangalore
x 3

#192 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Rsachi » 07 Jul 2016, 09:09

You're right. Everyone felt so too. But remember it is fiction, not history. There is Himadrisute also of Shyama Shastri sung in the movie, I think his compositions came to light much later than this time of history.

The competition was not WON by the local. The dancer ftom Tanjavur taunts that no one is there in that place to compete with her. The local devadasi feels taunted, dons anklets, and makes mistakes. Anant Nag, the hero of the movie, comes to her rescue. The Tanjavur dancer says that the competition was between her and the local, hinting that his stepping in to save the day was uncalled for.

The chieftain does not pronounce the winner. He honours the Tanjavur dancer first generously. He simply gives a place in his court to the local dancer and singer. This episode is to take us to the story of their love affair afterwards.
G. V. Iyer was a perfectionist. Remember he made movies of Sankara, Ramanuja, Madhva etc. also in Sanskrit.

If anything, I feel BMK has not done his very best in this movie!

Post edit: Ravi, do you think the Kalakshetra style of Bharatanatyam with its adavus was prevalent in 18th century?
0 x

RaviSri
Posts: 448
Joined: 10 Apr 2011, 11:31

#193 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by RaviSri » 07 Jul 2016, 18:39

Remember he made movies of Sankara, Ramanuja, Madhva etc. also in Sanskrit.
Sankaracharya was made in Sanskrit, Film on Ramanuja was made in Tamil and on Madhwa in Kannada, all of course, by G.V.Iyer.
do you think the Kalakshetra style of Bharatanatyam with its adavus was prevalent in 18th century?
What Kalakshetra followed was essentially the Thanjavur style, what Rukmini Devi learnt from Pandanallur Meenakshisundaram Pillai, his son etc. The Thanjavur 'style' of Bharatanatyam was established and codified by the Quartette, disciples of Dikshitar, in the early 19th century. Pandanallur Meenakshisundaram was a grandson of one of the Quartette on the distaff side.
0 x

Rsachi
Posts: 4979
Joined: 31 Aug 2009, 13:54
Location: Bangalore
x 3

#194 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Rsachi » 07 Jul 2016, 19:35

RaviSri,
You're right about the other movies' languages. Thanks. I rechecked just now.

I watched only Adi Shankaracharya. I couldn't lay my hands on his movies Bhagavadgita and Swami Vivekananda. Please confirm/correct my impression that those movies are in Sanskrit.

I need you to explain in detail and educate me if the dance in that video is really the old style of Bharatanatyam from early 19th century. My conversations with several Kalakshetra artistes have given me the distinct impression that the dance forms extant before Rukmini Devi/Kalakshetra were quite different and lacked in clarity of advaus, a geometric perfection in movement, unexaggerated and subtle abhinaya, and simple costumes. The musicians were also, in the past, apparently positioned at the back of the dance artiste, standing and moving around.

When Hamsageete was released, we all felt that the dance scene, although very well depicted, took liberties with the historicity of the dance forms.

By the way here are interesting details about the locations used while filming Hamsageete.

http://karnatakatravel.blogspot.in/2014 ... a.html?m=1

Also, I didn't feel comfortable with the use of Shyama Shastri's composition/s in the song. Please elucidate your thoughts.
0 x

kvjayan
Posts: 31
Joined: 05 Apr 2014, 17:08

#195 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by kvjayan » 08 Jul 2016, 14:12

Vinay wrote:
isramesh wrote:
sweetsong wrote:You are welcome :)

Here is a rare video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZZhYEdpYrw
Thanks for the rare gem. By the way YouTube link for janani ninuvuna is not working.
Here you go: https://youtu.be/pMHK8GPj4FY?t=29m18s, Janani Ninnuvina as it should be sung!
Interestingly, this rendition of Janani Ninnuvina forms part of an 'ADITYA MUSIC Sangeetha' album entitled "Ninnu Joochi (Thyagaraja Krithis) II Dr. M. Balamuralikrishna II Thyagaraja Krithis". Other krithis rendered are, Ninnu Joochi (Sowrastra), Ninnu vina gathi (Kalyani) and Parama Paavana (Poorvi Kalyani). Just wonder how these krithis came to be labelled as Thyagaraja Krithis.
0 x

RaviSri
Posts: 448
Joined: 10 Apr 2011, 11:31

#196 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by RaviSri » 11 Jul 2016, 18:40

G.V.Iyer's film on Vivekananda is in Hindi and on Bhagavad Gita is in Sanskrit. Both are available on youtube.
The musicians were also, in the past, apparently positioned at the back of the dance artiste, standing and moving around.
Quite true. Musicians, including the nattuvanar would move along with the dancer behind her. It was Balasaraswati'sguru Kandappa Pillai who put an end to this practice in the 1930s. He and the musicians remained seated to the right of the dancer. He also convinced Pandanallur Meenakshisundaram Pillai (Pandanallur Thata) to start doing likewise. Kandappa Pillai also was a grandson of the Tanjore Quartette like the Pandanallur Thata.
the dance forms extant before Rukmini Devi/Kalakshetra were quite different and lacked in clarity of advaus, a geometric perfection in movement, unexaggerated and subtle abhinaya, and simple costumes.
This is a baseless, audacious and mischievous statement which the Kalakshetra people are fond of making. There is no truth in it. These people lay the entire credit for the renaissance of Bharatanatyam at Rukmini Devi's door which is ridiculous. All these myths were exploded later. i'll explain tomorrow.
0 x

Rsachi
Posts: 4979
Joined: 31 Aug 2009, 13:54
Location: Bangalore
x 3

#197 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Rsachi » 11 Jul 2016, 18:44

RaviSri, I look forward to it!
0 x

rshankar
Posts: 12702
Joined: 02 Feb 2010, 22:26
x 14
x 5

#198 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by rshankar » 11 Jul 2016, 22:35

RaviSri wrote: What Kalakshetra followed was essentially the Thanjavur style, what Rukmini Devi learnt from Pandanallur Meenakshisundaram Pillai, his son etc. The Thanjavur 'style' of Bharatanatyam was established and codified by the Quartette, disciples of Dikshitar, in the early 19th century. Pandanallur Meenakshisundaram was a grandson of one of the Quartette on the distaff side.
What Smt. RDA learnt from Sri Meenakshisundaram Pillai was the Pandanallur style, wasn't it?


If I understand this correctly, I think (as RaviSri has stated) that most of the styles of bharatanATyam in vogue today can trace their origin to the quartette (TQ) - however, the naTTuvanArs who succeeded them did make modifications: I am amazed that these masters, with no formal training in kinesiology, and just their very well developed sense of aesthetics made subtle but very distinct changes in the way the hands were held (e.g., rounded in the vazhuvUr style, straight and angular in the pandanallUr style etc.), the body was presented to the audience (at an angle versus straight on), and the movements/aDavus were executed (many variations here, including jumps), and created their own uniquely individual styles - the pandanallUr style, the vazhuvUr style, the tanjAvUr style (I suspect that this is the one that is most faithful to the TQ's style), the kAncIpuram style etc. I am not sure how the mELattUr style and the Mysore style evolved from the TQ's. Over time, I think two things have happened - even as many more changes came into being that differentiated the styles, dancers started to learn from teachers from different styles and began evolving blended styles, with blurred distinctions.

The kalAkshEtra style was a based on the pandanallUr style: One distinction between the pandanallUr style and the kalAkshEtra style that even lay rasikas can appreciate is the way the taTTimeTTus are executed. There are many more differences that are evident to dancers.
0 x

Vinay
Posts: 33
Joined: 16 Apr 2009, 16:06
Location: Kerala/Manipal

#199 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by Vinay » 12 Jul 2016, 21:47

kvjayan wrote: Interestingly, this rendition of Janani Ninnuvina forms part of an 'ADITYA MUSIC Sangeetha' album entitled "Ninnu Joochi (Thyagaraja Krithis) II Dr. M. Balamuralikrishna II Thyagaraja Krithis". Other krithis rendered are, Ninnu Joochi (Sowrastra), Ninnu vina gathi (Kalyani) and Parama Paavana (Poorvi Kalyani). Just wonder how these krithis came to be labelled as Thyagaraja Krithis.
You are right, I first listened to it in a cassette with those songs. Here is its inlay card:
Image

I don't know at what point during its re-release(?) it got mislabelled as "Thyagaraja Krithis". None of them is Thyagaraja's! And by the way, Ninnu Vina is one of the finest (and different from the ordinary) compositions in Kalyani. These two krithis (Janani and Ninnuvina) have given me immense joy and afterwards, immense sorrow at the thought that Subbaraya Shastri had not composed more!
0 x

RaviSri
Posts: 448
Joined: 10 Apr 2011, 11:31

#200 Re: Balamuralikrishna

Post by RaviSri » 15 Jul 2016, 18:56

As rshankar has explained, all the styles in vogue in Tamilnadu are derived from the Thanjavur Quartette. There were slight differences in the adavus, each made according to the Natyacharya's own perceptions and manodharma. The various styles or bhANis that we get to hear of now (personally, I dont' consider style to be equivalent to bhANi, which has a deeper meaning and content, either n music or in dance) were named after the respective villages from which the gurus hailed, Pandanallur, Vazhuvur etc.

Rukmini Devi learnt not only from the Pandanallur Thata and his son Chokkalingam Pillai but also from Kattumannarkoil Muthukumara Pillai. What she did was to eschew the sringAra aspects of Bharatanatyam totally and emphasise the bhakti aspects. Most dancers of those days considered sringAra to be the greatest rasa as far as dance was concerned. Balasaraswati used to call this dance "cleansed" of sringAra as pApAthi nATyam (brahmin dance). In the early 1940s itself you had Bharatanatyam Kamala, the one and only Kamala, dancing into the hearts of rasiksa as Baby Kamala. She had her adavu training from Kattumannarkoil. And later learnt individual items from Vazhuvur Ramayya Pillai. The dance world recognised her as the principle artist of the "Vazhuvur bhANI", though she did not change what she had learnt from Kattumannarkoil. This itself proves that there was very little difference between the various gurus belonging to the Thanjavur bhANI.

Rukmini Devi's contribution to dance was the change she brought about in the costume worn by dancers. Earlier dancers wore the pyjama. It was Rukmini Devi who made the change to what is widely prevalent now. Plus her beautiful dance dramas.

(I'll continue)
0 x

Post Reply