meaning of kUTTa

Languages used in Carnatic Music & Literature
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vasanthakokilam
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#1 meaning of kUTTa

Post by vasanthakokilam » 30 Sep 2013, 00:49

Split off from the thread "M S Sheela: Detroit Sep 28th 2013" http://www.rasikas.org/forum/posting.ph ... 3&p=248182
mahavishnu wrote:Sreeni: Thanks for your report. And that is a lovely picture too!
I am sure Smt Sheela's kannaDA repertoire had plenty to offer to the crowd.

Btw, I take it that in the kannaDA language you use the word "koota" as gathering and not as "crowd".
Mahavishnu: I also wondered about it.. Given the usage by my kannada friends, I take it as Kannada Sangam. The related words in Tamil are Koottal or Koottam. Koottam ( and sangam/sangamam ) is not quite satisfactory since it typically refers to a gathering and not to a permanent entity/association of people. Koottal is a bit better but may be the word 'Kotram' as in "Neer vazhga ! Nin Kotram Vazhga!" is even closer.

We will wait for Sreeni.
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Sreeni Rajarao
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#2 Re: M S Sheela: Detroit Sep 28th 2013

Post by Sreeni Rajarao » 30 Sep 2013, 01:18

Yes, Koota is used to mean gathering, union, assembly. You will typically see kannaDa koota or kannaDa sangha in the names of kannaDa Associations spread across the U S. For eg, milana is the name of Milwaukee kannaDa koota. Arizona's is called Arizona kannaDa sangha; Chicago's is Vidyaranya kannaDa koota
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arasi
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#3 Re: M S Sheela: Detroit Sep 28th 2013

Post by arasi » 07 Oct 2013, 02:17

kUTa in tamizh has a closer word which we don't use. kUTTu, it is--in the coming together sense. To gather.Take it a step further--kUTTuRavu, which we use in a different context (a cooperative).

Bharathi uses kUTTuk kaLi (united joyful state) in kANi nilam vENDum. I think in tamizh, somehow the word became more and more to mean a crowd (gumbal), by sheer usage.

After all, the verb kUDudal means to gather. To add, in southern TN and Kerala, kUDudal means something else also (excess, extra) andak kaDaiyilE vilai kUDudal (jAsthi, extra) :)
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Ponbhairavi
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#4 Re: M S Sheela: Detroit Sep 28th 2013

Post by Ponbhairavi » 09 Oct 2013, 17:13

kUttam=crowd assemblyகூட்டம். meeting(kUttam yethanai manikku ? )
kUdam=கூடம்= கூடும் இடம் .in old houses we have kUdam thaazhvaram and mutram- that kUdam corresponding to our hall or lounge.In chennai some old marriage choultries were called Ramanuja koodam.
pallikUdam, kUdathu isai is the tamil word for chamber music.
the place taken to mean its content is ஆகு பெயர்
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Rsachi
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#5 Re: M S Sheela: Detroit Sep 28th 2013

Post by Rsachi » 09 Oct 2013, 18:01

'kUTa' in Kannada is a word used for a harmonious gathering, union.
makkaLa kUTa is a well known place in Chamarajapet next to RSM and predates it.
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vasanthakokilam
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#6 Re: M S Sheela: Detroit Sep 28th 2013

Post by vasanthakokilam » 10 Oct 2013, 11:03

OK, I get how the verb 'kUDudal' ( to gather ) becomes the noun kUTTam to refer to 'crowd', and also, as a rare usage, the place where such a gathering takes place.

But kUTTa for organization would feel odd in Tamil. For example, 'thozhilALar kUTTam' would not represent an organization of workers but a gathering of workers. On the other hand, the word Sangam originally had the connotation of gathering ( 'first tamil sangam' ) but now that will be a bit odd. thozhilALar sangam would be an organization of workers and not a gathering of workers. ( granted that calling a Tamil Conference as Tamil Sangam is in usage but that is more a homage to antiquity )
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arasi
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#7 Re: M S Sheela: Detroit Sep 28th 2013

Post by arasi » 10 Oct 2013, 19:07

sangam is a vaDa mozhi Sol (sanskrit word) in today's context.
amaippu is another choice.

All this belongs in the Languages thread :)
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