500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Languages used in Carnatic Music & Literature
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sridhar_ranga
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#1 500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Post by sridhar_ranga » 12 Jan 2009, 12:12

Per VK's suggestion let us post the most frequently used telugu words/phrases in carnatic compositions...knowledge of these words will enhance the listeners' appreciation of the bhava/saahityam of the magnificent works of our great vaggeyakaras
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cmlover
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#2

Post by cmlover » 12 Jan 2009, 23:43

Let me start :)
1. Telu^Ngu -- One of the sweetest among languages which is the foundation of CM..
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byraju
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#3

Post by byraju » 03 Feb 2009, 12:34

Generally all the artists sing the kriti as

Raaga Suda rasa- The meaning being raagam is just like nectar.


Sudha-Amritham, Nectar-Supposed to be sung

Suda- no meaning-generally sung like raaga suda rasa. I am unable to match anywhere.

Sudda- chalk

Meaning: The raga is fully sweet and is comparable with amritham. If the meaning is understood their performance will have more value based.
Last edited by byraju on 03 Feb 2009, 12:50, edited 1 time in total.
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byraju
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#4

Post by byraju » 03 Feb 2009, 12:43

There is one more kriti,

Chuthamu Raree Sudatulara Rangapatini- What a wonderful composition by Thyagaraja. But unfortunately one artist (not to mention his and his guru's name) sings as Juthamu Raree which does not carry any kind of meaning in telugu. Highly disgraceful.
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Vinay
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#5

Post by Vinay » 11 May 2009, 03:49

Sad to see that this thread hasn't progressed much. : (
I really want to get started learning Telugu!

Let's see if I can start something...

Could someone explain all/most possible meanings of the word "kOri", with various examples? As in Ninnu Kori, the mohana raga adi tala varna, and of course, Viriboni Ninne Kori! And other instances if they carry different meanings.
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keerthi
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#6

Post by keerthi » 11 May 2009, 11:37

KOri is 'having begged'..

equivalents are the same in tamil and kannada.. Korike/ korikai is request.. Ninnu kori/ ninne kori means 'having begged you'.
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Vinay
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#7

Post by Vinay » 11 May 2009, 17:47

Ah, I see. Why is it "ninnu" in Ninnu Kori and "ninne" in Viriboni though?
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rshankar
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#8

Post by rshankar » 12 May 2009, 01:30

ninnu is 'you' or unnai in tamizh, tumkO/ApkO in hindi.

ninnE is 'just/only (for) you' or unnaiyE in tamizh, tumhi kO/AphI kO in hindi
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Vinay
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#9

Post by Vinay » 12 May 2009, 04:34

Oh, okay. Thank you for the clarification. : D

That makes five words so far then! Hopefully more people will ask/explain other common words.
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vasanthakokilam
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#10

Post by vasanthakokilam » 12 May 2009, 05:57

I like the trend that is developing in this thread. Let us keep it going. Thanks Ravi.

As a bonus, we get to learn the equivalent words in Hindi as well. Great!
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arasi
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#11

Post by arasi » 12 May 2009, 06:22

The lovely old tamizh word for it is viNNappam. ADiyEn viNNappam (vaishNavite expression).
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cmlover
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#12

Post by cmlover » 12 May 2009, 07:59

viNNa = pinched/broken/sliced (colloquial form of viNDa)
appam = sweetmeat
viNNappam = delicious piece of sweetmeat :)
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vasanthakokilam
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#13

Post by vasanthakokilam » 12 May 2009, 08:27

Along the 'You/I' line of words, there are few other words that seem to occur frequently.

nIku - You ( context? )
nIvu - You
nIvE ( you alone ? )

nannu ( I / me )

Other low hanging fruits are:

manasA ( mind ), hRdaya ( heart )
aparAdhamulu ( offense / punishment )
mannimpumu ( pardon )
abhimAnamu ( affection )
brova ( protect )
pAlimpa ( protect )
nija ( true )
marma ( secret )
nimishamu ( minute )
telisi ( knowing )
nIla maNi ( sapphire, literally blue pearl )
bAram ( weight )

lEdA (not)
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vasanthakokilam
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#14

Post by vasanthakokilam » 12 May 2009, 09:43

Here is another take on this lesson. I used Sri. Govindan's list of Tyagaraja krithi titles and created a histogram of words that occur two or more times. If we can fill out the meanings of these words, that will be a good first step. The number to the left of the word indicates the number of times they occurred in the title of the various thyagaraja compositions.

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vganesh
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#15

Post by vganesh » 12 May 2009, 09:49

Nice VK Sir. Telugu knowing rasikas please enlighten us :P
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rajeshnat
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#16

Post by rajeshnat » 12 May 2009, 09:50

WIth this VK's posting , I am composing a new pallavi line
vara nArada mAnasa Ananda kalyAna ramanA ;) , I am delegating ravi to give the meaning.
Last edited by rajeshnat on 12 May 2009, 09:51, edited 1 time in total.
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coolkarni
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#17

Post by coolkarni » 12 May 2009, 11:06

..
Last edited by coolkarni on 24 Nov 2009, 09:49, edited 1 time in total.
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isramesh
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#18

Post by isramesh » 12 May 2009, 11:18

I am trying to give meanings to some of the words. Generally I tried to avoid words of Sanskrit origin where I felt I cannot give proper word in English. I request others to look into those words and also to correct any mistakes in what I gave. Further, as is the case with other Indian languages, the meaning has to be taken according to the context of the song / sentence. Also, a small change from shorter vowel to longer vowel at the end changes the meaning (eg. nErcina = having learnt, and nErcinA = inspite of having learnt / being learned). However as our rasikas are well exposed to CM, I hope they will figure it out.

nI = yours
daya = grace, kindness, symphathy, etc
rArA = come on!, to invite
nannu = me, myself
nE = shorter form for ‘nEnu’ meaning I, me,
nA = my
bhajana = prayer (song)
rAdA = (asking) will it not come, happen, etc as per context. eg. Tyagaraja asks rAmA ‘nI daya rAdA’ - meaning Oh rAmA, will your grace never comes to me.
ninu = "ninnu"
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vasanthakokilam
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#19

Post by vasanthakokilam » 12 May 2009, 12:18

Thanks very much isramesh. That is going to be of great use to a lot of rasikas and musicians.

I did a similar histogram on the entire sahitya of all the tyagaraja compositions from Sri. Govindan's database. Here are the top 500. The number to the left of the word is not a count from the compositions themselves but a count in in Sri. Govindan's document ( which includes commentary ) but the relative frequency should be close enough to the actual compositions. ( except the high runner thyagaraja is left out ). Several words appear in both lists, you can give the meaning of the new entires in the second table. Also, I did not do any manual review of the output of my script, so some english words may have snuck in there and other such anamolies.
Please note that in the transliteration scheme that Sri. Govindan uses, sri is written as zri etc.

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isramesh
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#20

Post by isramesh » 12 May 2009, 14:11

I shall try to give the meanings later today (or at the most tomorrow)
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Vinay
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#21

Post by Vinay » 12 May 2009, 15:16

WOW! A whole lot seems to have happened here while I was asleep. Very rapid developments, I must say.

Wonderful work, vasanthakokilam! That was much needed. Are you a programmer then? Or did you use some software that was already available?
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vasanthakokilam
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#22

Post by vasanthakokilam » 12 May 2009, 22:57

isramesh: Thanks. Please take your time. I updated the above list by running my scripts again and picked the top 500 words. This list is 100% automatically produced with no manual editing. The previous one involved some editing on my part which I avoided in this list. Because of 100% automation and no manual review/edit, some english words may have snuck in and there can be few other anamolies.

500 words may be overwhelming. We can work on this slowy and steadily.
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vasanthakokilam
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#23

Post by vasanthakokilam » 12 May 2009, 23:11

>Or did you use some software that was already available

On a whim, I started writing some UNIX scripts last evening to organize the words from Govindan's invaluable database here: http://thyagaraja-vaibhavam.blogspot.com/

I saved his database as a txt document and ran it through the scripts. For interested parties who can speak UNIX, here is the gobbledegook

Code: Select all

cat ThyagarajaVaibhavam.txt | sed 's/-.*$//' | sed 's/ /n/g' | grep "(.*)"| sed 's/[,!;?.]//' | grep -v "(.)"| sort | uniq -c | sort -r | grep " (.*)" | sed 's/(//' | sed 's/)//' | split -l 50
paste -d, xaa xab xac xad xae xaf xag xah xai xaj
The first line creates the histogram and then splits them into chunks of 50. The second line creates a comma-separated-value (csv) file of 10 such chunks organized side by side for a total of 500 words. This .csv fie can then be opened in Excel.
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Vinay
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#24

Post by Vinay » 12 May 2009, 23:34

Ah yes, I've been going through Govindan's work for the past week or so. Also downloaded the PDF versions. Indeed an invaluable resource. I hope to do something similar with Balamurali compositions, eventually. Since I don't have any source of his compositions, and I've just about started learning Telugu, it looks I'll have to trouble Lakshman and keerthi and rshankar and isramesh and various others here, lol. But then I'm quite lazy and this will proceed really slowly.

A UNIX user, eh? : o
I've been using Ubuntu myself since I bought my laptop nearly a year ago. But I have a long way to go with bash scripting before I can make sense of your script. Gotta learn RegExp too. The more I learn about you, the more interesting you get (in a good way of course!), if I may say so, hehe.
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rshankar
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#25

Post by rshankar » 13 May 2009, 01:01

vasanthakokilam wrote:Along the 'You/I' line of words, there are two other words that seem to occur frequently.

nIku - You ( context? )
nIvu - You
nIvE ( you alone ? )

nannu ( I / me )

Other low hanging fruits are:

manasA ( mind ), hRdaya ( heart )
aparAdhamulu ( offense / punishment )
mannimpumu ( pardon )
abhimAnamu ( affection )
brova ( protect )
pAlimpa ( protect )
nija ( true )
marma ( secret )
nimishamu ( minute )
telisi ( knowing )
nIla maNi ( sapphire, literally blue pearl )
bAram ( weight )

lEdA (not)
Some minor corrections:

nIku - for you, unakku, tumkO
nIvu - you (with respect), nIr, nIngaL, Ap
nIvE - 'even'/'only' you, nIrE, nIngaLE, Ap bhI
nannu - me, ennai, mujhE
lEdu - not, illai, nahIn
lEdA - is it not?, illaiyA?, nahIn?
abhimAnamu - pride, abhimAnam, abhimAn
Last edited by rshankar on 13 May 2009, 01:02, edited 1 time in total.
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