500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Languages used in Carnatic Music & Literature
rshankar
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#126

Post by rshankar » 28 Aug 2009, 23:15

But sEvakan is a word that's borrowed from sanskrit, and not an indegenous tamizh word (and hence, can't be pre-modern?)
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arunk
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#127

Post by arunk » 29 Aug 2009, 00:24

It is indeed borrowed although tamil has been borrowing from sanskrit for quite a while. Still there must be a indigenous (say old tamil) equivalent - i do not know what it is.

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arunk
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#128

Post by arunk » 29 Aug 2009, 00:27

maybe paNiyAL?
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srkris
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#129

Post by srkris » 29 Aug 2009, 01:09

rshankar wrote:But sEvakan is a word that's borrowed from sanskrit, and not an indegenous tamizh word (and hence, can't be pre-modern?)
On the other hand it is pre-modern exactly for the same reason. Its even found in the Tiruvachakam (circa 9th century CE). There is currently no Tamil literature we know of (right from the earliest) without words borrowed from Indic.

I can't read Telugu script, but Brown's Telugu Dictionary lists baNTu as

బంటà±ÂÂ
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arasi
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#130

Post by arasi » 29 Aug 2009, 02:04

ANDAL uses it: enRenRun sEvakamE ETRip paRai koLVAn

aDiyAL, aDimai, Uzhiyan ??
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sridhar_ranga
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#131

Post by sridhar_ranga » 29 Aug 2009, 12:24

toNDan is probably the closest Tamil equivalent to sEvakan.
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sridhar_ranga
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#132

Post by sridhar_ranga » 29 Aug 2009, 12:41

transliteration for some of the telugu words in 129:

a pawn at chess - sEvakuDu
a devotee, bhaktuDu
a disciple, SishyuDu
a brave man, SuruDu
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sridhar_ranga
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#133

Post by sridhar_ranga » 29 Aug 2009, 12:42

I miss the edit button.
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srkris
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#134

Post by srkris » 29 Aug 2009, 13:44

Suji Ram wrote:'aravam' in telugu means- we won't shout.
When Telugus use the word 'aravamu' or 'aravalu' to refer to Tamil people (or to the language), it is the Tamil meaning that applies, the tamil meaning of aravam is serpent. The word is derived from Skt. sarpam.

Probably Tamils were in ancient times called the Nagas (snake people or snake worshippers). The buddhist canon (dIrgha nikAya 20: MahÄÂÂ
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prabuddha
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#135

Post by prabuddha » 29 Aug 2009, 19:21

1) Saying 'sEvakan' is a more traditional register of the language. They will be armed with sticks as are 'aDi AL'. It just means a retainer of a feudal lord, local zamindar, oor periyavar etc
2) Sri TS Parthasarathi has used a register of Tamil which was very respectable and formal until the 1900's or so. That's what I meant. This 'tanittamiz' and the related disease of looking for pure Tamil equivalents for every word commonly used in Tamil is of recent origin.
3) I've used pre modern in the sense of anything before 1900
4) Some Sanskrit I'm sure has always been there in Tamil
5) aravam is noise in Tamil too. To contrast, Andal uses 'pEccharavam' for conversation as in 'pEccharavam kETTilaiyO' in the 'keesu keesenRu' song and 'puRRaravam' for snake in the 'kaRRu karavai kaNangaL' song.
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srkris
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#136

Post by srkris » 29 Aug 2009, 20:58

கீசà¯ÂÂ
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arasi
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#137

Post by arasi » 29 Aug 2009, 21:46

srkris,
kIcu kIcenRu--is how ANDAL sang--meaning, the sound of birds).
kIccu kIccu is is more modern.
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srkris
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#138

Post by srkris » 29 Aug 2009, 23:45

Oh OK... pls continue with the telugu stuff. :)
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PUNARVASU
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#139

Post by PUNARVASU » 30 Aug 2009, 16:57

sridhar_rang wrote:transliteration for some of the telugu words in 129:

a pawn at chess - sEvakuDu
a devotee, bhaktuDu
a disciple, SishyuDu
a brave man, SuruDu
should it not be 'SUruDu'-brave man (from the word SUra)
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sridhar_ranga
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#140

Post by sridhar_ranga » 30 Aug 2009, 18:48

Yes Punarvasu, it is SUruDu.

Now you know why I missed that edit facility immediately after posting it! :)
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sankark
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#141 Re: 500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Post by sankark » 17 Nov 2014, 06:52

Just now came across this thread. One thing that I have been thinking about.

How does a word get established as sanskrit (indic?) originated/derived. Couldn't sEvai become sEva or aravam become sarpam? Just curious. Any good online references to read up on?
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Pratyaksham Bala
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#142 Re: 500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Post by Pratyaksham Bala » 17 Nov 2014, 08:26

arava in Sanskrit means noiseless !
sEv in Sanskrit means serve / obey / worship. And sEvaka means servant / attendant / follwer.

It is curious that the common Tamil word ANi (nail) is found in Rig Veda.
Similarly, the Tamil word nIr (water) is similar to nIra (water) in Mahabharata.
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vasanthakokilam
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#144 Re: 500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Post by vasanthakokilam » 18 Nov 2014, 04:07

Good resource. Thanks
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vgovindan
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#145 Re: 500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Post by vgovindan » 20 Nov 2014, 23:59

aravam is derived from a+ravam - without sound - having no aspirated consonants.
http://dsalsrv02.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/r ... able=brown
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natyasri
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#146 Re: 500+ most frequently used telugu words in carnatic music

Post by natyasri » 01 Sep 2015, 22:52

its bharamu and not bAramu.
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