AMS Easy Methods 2007 CD - Teaching and Learning Methods

To teach and learn Indian classical music
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srikant1987
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#76

Post by srikant1987 » 07 May 2009, 21:16

I don't think there's any one-size-fits-all teaching technique for Carnatic music.
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sbala
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#77

Post by sbala » 07 May 2009, 21:43

I don't think akellaji claims that there is a one size fits all technique.
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vasanthakokilam
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#78

Post by vasanthakokilam » 07 May 2009, 21:51

All these sundry comments aside, msakella has spent his life time evolving a reliable and predictable teaching method and he has extensively written about it and made all the material available to us for free. I do not know what else one can ask for.

It will be good if the discussion itself is about the AMS method, questions about the method and sharing of experiences of those who are using the method.

One thing that does not get emphasized enough is, his methods are a break-through in CM teaching. It does two things. It boldly declares, implicitly and explicitly, the invalidity of the old notions that only those who come from musical families or from certain communities can learn the music to the fullest extent. He has high standards and his own strongly held opinions on what an ideal student is, but that can be anybody. What matters is some basic talent in rhythm and a commitment for time and dedication.

Second, he strives hard to teach the basic tools and techniques so the student is independent in a fairly short time compared to traditional teaching methods. I always view it with suspicion when people repeat the common notion that music can only be learnt from gurus directly. Definitely, there are advantages to learning from someone directly but I think those who use the AMS method is in a for a life time of independence. They can increase their repertoire rapidly and independently and at their own pace, after acquiring the tools and techniques from a guru.

It is a case of him teaching someone to make a really tasty rasam rather than simply feeding them pre-made rasam! This way, one can make rasam for life :)

There is a wealth of material available, definitely one of a kind, in his free CD AMS Easy Methods 2007 which are uploaded here for free access by anyone http://www.sangeethamshare.org/chandra/ ... hods-2007/ . Even if you do not want to follow every lesson, the symbolized gamakas and their illustrative audio recordings are a great contribution to the field of carnatic music and should be useful to musicians and rasikas alike. I would like members to get familiar with them and discuss them here.
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Nick H
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#79

Post by Nick H » 07 May 2009, 22:06

Maybe it is that he has had a lifetime's practice, but I find the way that msakella deflects the sometimes bitter and personal criticism of his ways, and sometimes his person, with calm and even gentleness, to be an inspiration in itself.
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msakella
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#80

Post by msakella » 08 May 2009, 17:02

Dear brother-members, srikant1987, sbala, vasanthakokilam & nick H, Thank you all for your ways of appreciation.

Only the Almighty has the only one-size-fits-all teaching technique for all and all others are only parts of HIM. In my case the Almighty has also blessed me with both the varieties of calmness and sharpness at a time for my advantage.

Any person is supposed to eat away idli along with chatny. But, here, while some ‘apaswaras’ are able to eat chatny only our brother-member, vasanthakokilam, is able to swallow both and have the real enjoyment.

Previously, the aspirants are used to remain in the so called Gurukulas for years to learn this art and ultimately many have ended up with only the bad habits of their Guru but not much with the art. More over, nowadays, in this speedy age, it is highly impossible to make such a long study and, at this juncture, the process must be quickened maintaining good quality and lessening the dependency upon the money-minded teacher. All these things made me work hard to find a fool-proof solution of this novel method of teaching.

The following important points are to be observed and followed in this connection in the interest of our kids and our culture.

01.Age factor: As this is an invisible art and needs a very sharp brain to grasp, understand and retain the subject and also a very strong physical body to undergo the strenous and persevarant practice tender age between 8 and 15 years of age is highly preferable to learn this art. At the same time it is high time to quicken both the processes of learning and practice even before this age which enables the aspirant make a mark in the field. As per my deep study I have found that the progress of the aspirants gradually recedes in multiplying speed beyond the age of 20 years. That’s why, as the founder President of the Teaching Staff Association (State), when I worked hard to bring out one G.O. in which the maximum age limit prescribed was 25 years for getting admission into our Govt. Music Colleges many of the house-wives of the higher-ups later tried their level best to get it scrapped and succeeded. To yield good results from the younger talent the kids should be admitted into the system of NOS - National Institute of Open Schooling through which they can concentrate much on music devoting more than 5 or 6 hrs. daily preferably in the morning hours and, later, study all the general subjects for 2 or 3 hours daily, thus giving the first preference to this fine art. Thus, from now on, the young talent must be encouraged by this kind of simultaneous general study and art study.

02.Qualitative-teaching: Teaching only the items of the syllabus comes under quantitative-teaching and giving good base right from the first day of learning music leading to the knowledge of singing Svarakalpana and Ragalapana comes under qualitative-teaching. Surprisingly enough, while all the private teachers are mostly concentrating upon quantitative-teaching teaching either number of Varnas or number of different compositions of various composers like main-pancharatnas or Kovur-pancharatnas or Lalgudi-pancharatnas or Tiruvottiyur-pancharatnas of Thyagaraja or Navagraha-kritis or Navaavarana-Kritis or Panchalingasthala-kritis of Dikshitar or 72-melaragamalika of Mahavaidyanatha Iyer etc., etc., even all the salary-paid teachers of all the Govt. Institutions of Music and the music departments of various Universities are also concentrating upon teaching only the items of the syllabus under quantitative-teaching but teaching very little of Svarakalpana and Ragalapana of the Manodharma-sangita that too just before the examinations and cleverly throwing entire responsibility upon the poor aspirants that they must be acquired by the aspirants themselves only by constant listening of the recordings or CDs of the stalwarts of yester years and by heavy regular and strenuous practice. But, while all the teachers are of the opinion that the Svarakalpana and Ragalapana must be acquired by constant listening and heavy pracitce of the aspirant himself

I have proved in this novel system of teaching that they could very easily be taught to the aspirant mostly basing upon his rhythmical instinct. Only for this purpose 20 kinds of rhythmical exercises have been formulated not only to test the level of the rhythmical instinct of the aspirant even on the first day of his music-lesson but also to improve and stabilize it. Basing upon this rhythmical abilities of the aspirant and also according to this novel system of teaching the qualitative-teaching should be made upto Varnas enabling the aspirant proceed from Kritis on his own. Unless stringent measures are taken to strictly implement this qualitative-teaching by even the above mentioined salary-paid teachers, even the students produced by these teachers remain as impotent as the students produced by the private teachers. Even though all the students studying in the music-departments of the universities are of full time they are unable to take this music as profession, at the least as teachers, due to the non-effective quantitative-teaching of the teachers. While the music environment in Tamilnadu, however, is helping these students by attending some concerts to cope up with Svarakalpana and Ragalapana up to some extent, in the absence of such environment in Andhra Pradesh the students of this State are suffering a lot by the indifferent attitude of the salary-paid teachers in making qualitative teaching.

In last December, when accidentally I happened to go to the Great Kalakshetra and met some of their students, I found only quantitative-teaching is made and wrote to the Director to take necessary steps for qualitative-teaching. But, that Director, instead of doing the needful, found fault with me for having met their students without prior permission from her or from their respective teacher. This obviously reveals that teachers are not ready to find fault with them but they do as they like.

Very recently, when I have made a represention to the Vice-Chancellor of the Telugu University, to remove me from the member-ship of the Board of Studies as I mis-fit in it in the absence of any qualitative-teaching, he was afraid to take any kind of action and kept silent without any kind of response.

03.Text books for music also: Adding fuel to the fire, pitiably enough, while text books are available for any subject in all the educational institutions, the music-teachers are always adament in providing such text books with notated compositions and pre-recorded cassettes or CDs of the same notations to the aspirants. Even if such notations are supplied for the compositions of the syllabus at some places one teacher differs with another teacher in respect of even the same composition leading to chaos among students. When the composer composed the composition in a single notation I do not understand why all the different teachers maintain different versions of notation and blatantly refuse to maintain a single notation even in the interest of their students.

04.Teacher training course in music: There is only one music-teacher-training-course attached and run by the Music Academy, Chennai since more than 50 years and even this one is also for only Vocal-teachers. This kind of training courses must be opened country wide for vocal and instruments to cater the needs of the public. In respect of music also facilities must be provided for Educatioinal Research and Training like NCERT (National Council for Educational Research and Training) and these teacher-training-institutes must be maintained by them for maintaining standards and issue relevant certificates for Teachers. Pitiably enough, even in Chennai, the famous centre for Karnataka music of our country, even though there are umpteen organisations arranging a number of concerts and different seasonal festivals, there is not even a single organisation ever arranged a seminar or symposium or conference, once in a year at the least, on methods of teaching music for the benefit of our aspirants.

05.Supervisory set-up: Pitiably enough, since last 50 years, there was not even a single academic inspection in any of the Govt. Music Colleges of Andhra Pradesh. Never there was even a cell for inspection for this purpose and taking this advantage all the teachers are teaching the students as they like and nobody has any interest at all in rectifying this perennial defect. While other foreign countries are able to introduce even B.Tech. in Music and M.Tech. in music we are unable even to rectify many of our defects and to maintain standards in the name of great tradition.

06.Prescribing syllabus for the award of different scholarships: Even for the award of Scholarships of either the lower-age-groups or higher-age-groups no syllabus has ever been prescribed giving scope for high malpractice. When once I happened to act as the Judge for one of it when I asked each and every candidate to render the Alankaras in Ata and Triputa-talas in 3rd degree of speed to test their rhythmical ability in the absence of any syllabus many of the candidates failed and all their respective music-teachers unanimously cried out against me and made a collective representation not to select me thereafter as a Judge and succeeded. Even in the preliminary audition-test of All India Radio no rhythmical test has ever been prescribed though needed. amsharma
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manjunath
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#81

Post by manjunath » 09 May 2009, 15:50

Akellaji,

You are diverting the matter. The problem is you are not taking the problems mentioned to right people. In this forum no one can solve your problems. I think better you take it to the concerned authoritites/ the government rather disgrading or disrespecting musicians and blaming them on dialy basis. First, you must try to find out where the peoblem is and why they are not listning to your suggesstions. I feel the problem lies with you. First you should learn to respect peolple and then take the problems and suggestions to them. No matter how ever genious you may be without respecting musicans and mixing with them you can not solve any thing . You are saying you have proven your methods. Your methods shoud be proven by other musicians and not by only you. From these postings again you have proven that musicans should listen to you and you will not. If you really want to serve the music you would have continued accepting others and slowly try to change them with your good acts and kindness instead of saying i am right and i am right.
Last edited by manjunath on 09 May 2009, 15:53, edited 1 time in total.
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msakella
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#82

Post by msakella » 09 May 2009, 16:34

Dear brother-member, manjunath, Very sorry. I cannot continue the dialogue with a person who is afraid to come out open and does not even try know the facts and figures but, some how, likes to make irrational and insensible arguments. amsharma
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manjunath
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#83

Post by manjunath » 09 May 2009, 18:02

Akellaji,

I am not afraid. you are afraid to tell the names of musicians openly those you feel not done any thing for music. Instead of naming the people /musicians who have not done anything for music, you are blaming all the teachers and musicians in every post of yours.
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vasanthakokilam
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#84

Post by vasanthakokilam » 09 May 2009, 21:04

manjunath: If you need to have a one on one argument with msakella please do it through other means like email.

In general, we would like members to deal with such topics in a general fashion and not name individuals if at all possible.
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sangeethamquest
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#85

Post by sangeethamquest » 11 May 2009, 10:32

I agree. Please take any personal difference of opinions/arguments offline.
Akellaji please continue your excellent service/work.
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msakella
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#86

Post by msakella » 11 May 2009, 15:53

Dear brother-members, vasanthakokilam & sangeethamquest, Thank you for your sincere support in real service to the cause of music. With all your support I shall certainly continue my writings and give all the details though some of them are bitter truths only in the deep interest of rendering true service to the cause of our music and also all our kids but not with any kind of self-interest which I do not need at all at this fagend of my life. amsharma
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Rasika911
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#87

Post by Rasika911 » 11 May 2009, 19:35

I must admit that I do not comprehend your way of teaching manodharma sangeetham. My understanding is that for swarakalpana you teach rythmic lessons and the students learn this.
For raga alapana you notate the alapana and they learn it?
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msakella
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#88

Post by msakella » 12 May 2009, 03:49

Dear brother-member, Rasika911, A small kid always try to very keenly observe his mother, father etc., etc., whoever he comes across and try to imitate them in every possible manner. After doing this for some time he starts doing things on his own. I have made umpteen experiments upon a number of students who are handy in my institution and found that, always, while the imitation is the first step in learning things the originality starts only later in doing things. We should never expect the originality right from the beginning itself. But, while every musician is telling that, except constant listening to the alwarts of yester years and heavily practicing them later, there is no easy method at all in singing Svarakalpana and Ragalapana,

I have given them special easy rhythmical exercises in which the mathematical element of real Muktayis has unimaginably been lessened to the minimum just to perform a ‘drill’ of Mridanga Jatis along with Tala for a short period at the end of which they are asked to sing the same in terms of pre-arranged svaras. After a very regular and planned practice of more than 4 or 5 hours for 2 or 3 months the aspirants will certainly become able to sing Svarakalpana on their own.

In the traditional way of teaching, there is no gurantee that the aspirant will get the same ability of singing Svarakalpana on his own even after 5 or 6 years. In the same manner, even for Ragalapana there is a planned method to make them sing Ragalapana on their own within a very short period which is unimaginable to any traditional teacher. Here, it is very important to note that all these methods differ even in implementing them from person to person depending upon their instinctive talents.

In fact, like music, these methods of teaching also are only demonstratable but not describable. I can’t help if all these novel methods of teaching in making this music strictly time-bound and result-oriented are incomprehensible to you. Practically seeing these advantages here some people are truly striving hard to propagate them sincerely for the benefit of our kids and are also getting unimaginable and fantastic results.

You can also visit ‘http://www.esnips.com/web/AMS-Violin-De ... šÂ¬Ã¢â€žÂ¢ to listen to some of the audio-clippings of some kids singing rhythmical Svarakalpana very efficiently. Among them bearing the names of the places are of the students of the respective Govt. Music Colleges recorded in 2006 and bearing the names of the students are of the S.V.College of Music & Dance, Tirupati recorded in 2007 - all trained by me only. You can also visit ‘youtube.com/msakella’ to find 6 recent Video-clippings of kids singing the intricate rhythmical exercises and Svarakalpana very efficiently. amsharma
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Rasika911
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#89

Post by Rasika911 » 13 May 2009, 06:14

Interesting indeed. However, I still dont understand how swara mukthaiys will enable a student to sing swarams for ragams like anandhabhairavi or sahana, it could be a disaster.

I am anticipating the youtube release of the kids singing ragam though :)
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msakella
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#90

Post by msakella » 13 May 2009, 11:39

Dear brother-member, Rasika911, Not only in vocal-singing but also in violin-playing there are vey interesting techniques which enable the aspirants do their job very quickly and efficiently.
If we very carefully and properly analyse the logic behing the thing certainly we can find a way. Even though I am a very little Vocalist and Violinst than all others I am able to properly analyse the logic and found a seccessful way out than many of others only by the grace of the Almighty.
For example, we shall, now, analyse it a little. If we carefully see we find four implications in singing Svarakalpana and they are, 1.Rhythm or Laya 2.Tala or meter of this rhythm or Laya 3.Svara-syllables such as Sa, Ri, Ga, Ma etc., 4. Svara-sounds of the same Svara-syllables. Unless the aspirant gets reasonable acquaintance and control over these 4 implications he cannot get through this Svarakalpana. Even in respect of the general mathematics our elders are used to make us regularly and daily recite, even in our 3rd year or 4th year of age, the respective tables hundreds of times in the process to keep us efficient in mathematics. In the same manner, at the first instance, it is very important to note that we should train the aspirants only in the tender age and, next, this training should be made in a planned manner without taxing the kid in all the 4 implications at a time. So, accordingly, to enable the aspirant sing the Svarakalpana, training must be started right from the first day of learning music but not after finishing some 10 Varnas and 20 Kritis which is usually done by all the music-teachers. Being a Mridangist in my younger age, for this purpose and for the first time in the history, I was able to formulate ‘Jati-alankaras’ having Mridangam-syllables which are to be taught to train the aspirant even before teaching him the seven notes. By making the aspirant practice with only beats and Jatis we can tax him go along with rhythm only and avoiding other three implications. To make the lessons also easier to the aspirant the seriatim of these Jati-alankaras must be taught from 4-units of Eka, 6-units of Rupaka, 10-units of Mathya, 14-units of Dhruva in the 1st group and 10-units of Jhampa, 14-units of Ata and 7-units of Triuputa of the 2nd group, very strictly in the same order only. The aspirant should be asked to render a beat with his right-hand on his right thigh spelling out ‘ki-ta’ followed by another beat with his left-hand on his left thigh spelling out ‘ta-ka’ - all in the duration of a single second which is called ‘Matra-kaala’ ie., 4-units per second. This itself is the Eka-tala-jati-alankara also. Without teaching the aspirant the Talangas at all, he should be taught all these Jati-alankaras only with the beats of both the hands in the above 2 groups, one after the other very strictly. If the aspirant is of around 8 years of age with tested laya-instinct, he can very successfully finish all these 7 Jati-alanakars in a single day. After this, Saralee-svaras should be taught by not direct-teaching but initiating him to simultaneously play the keys of Casio-MA-150 along with the beats of the in-built-metronome (@ 1-unit per each second i.e., 60 bpm) and sing the 7 notes in Shankarabharana. In this manner without direct-teaching he should only be initiated to simultaneously play and sing the Janta-svaras, Daatu-svaras & Svara-alankaras in the same way which could very easily and efficiently be finished within a week. Then, in the same way, without direct-teaching, he should only be initiated to sumultaneously play and sing the six Gitas also on his own. While learning the gitas he should be initiated to play the notes of Casio and sing Svara followed by Akaara and Saahitya, very strictly in this order only. After Gitas, at the first instance, the important Kampitas and Gamakas should be demonstrated and later Varnas in Natakuranji, Kambhoji, Darbar, Shankarabharana, Kalyani, Begada, Todi, Saveri and Bhairavi (Ata) along with Svarajati should be taught. Each and every varna has to be demonstrated and aught with full details of all oscillations. While the Varnas are taught on one hand all the 20 SREs (Special Rhythmical exercises) must be practised on the other. Later all these rhythmical patterns in the 20th SRE should also be practised in terms of Svaras of Sampoornas, Shadavas and Oudavas etc., which, in the end, leads to sing efficient Svarakalpana on their own. This is a well proven method of teaching Svarakalpana and later Ragalapana in quickening the process of teaching.
Prasently, the students who have not been trained previously in this method, are being trained gradually bringing them into this method and it takes some more time to enable them sing Ragalapana in this method. amsharma
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manjunath
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#91

Post by manjunath » 13 May 2009, 15:49

VK/SQ

What is the use of knowledge of Akellaji , which can't be accepted by music community and can't produce a talented musician? Those he is talking/quoting negative are proven to the world that they are musicians and serving for music atleast upto certain extent. But Akellaji never produced a talented musician except talking or saying he is great. My sincere request is let him not write or comment anything about the teachers. That's ends. Because this small teachers only tried to safe gaurd this music so far and not Akellaji. He is also one among the thousands and he is not alone the carnatic music.
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Rasika911
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#92

Post by Rasika911 » 13 May 2009, 18:33

manjunath wrote:VK/SQ

What is the use of knowledge of Akellaji , which can't be accepted by music community and can't produce a talented musician? Those he is talking/quoting negative are proven to the world that they are musicians and serving for music atleast upto certain extent. But Akellaji never produced a talented musician except talking or saying he is great. My sincere request is let him not write or comment anything about the teachers. That's ends. Because this small teachers only tried to safe gaurd this music so far and not Akellaji. He is also one among the thousands and he is not alone the carnatic music.
My problem is the method. The best way to sing an alapana for karaharapriya is to learn several krithis in it, there is no better proven way. Other methods dont require manodharmam and the student will be simply packaging without having any idea what they are singing.
My humble view :)
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vasanthakokilam
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#93

Post by vasanthakokilam » 13 May 2009, 20:02

Rasika911, I agree you have a preference for the traditional method but you are jumping to conclusions about Sri. msakella's method. I am not sure if you have given it due consideration. Like a sculptor or a painter, it is not enough to just see the works of past masters. It gives you ideas and inspirations but you still need tools and techniques to bring out those ideas. That is one of the aspects that msakella strives to achieve in a predictable way. Yes, one can say you keep on painiting in random ways, pretty soon you will get the hang of it. That is one way. The other way is to teach students exactly the techniques involved in painting. I do not think that necessarily means you are curbing the creativity of the student painter.

One thing that many people do not seem to know is that manodharma aspects like kalpanaswarams are not entirely on the spot creativity. Kalpanaswarams require a lot of laya ability even more than swara ability ( contrary to what one may think intuitively ). Getting a great grounding in laya early on provides the fertilized platform on which the swara creativity can bloom later on. Strength in Laya gives you that confidence because that platform is not shaky so you do not mind standing on top of it, even jump up and down joyfully, even willy nilly, without any fear of falling.

It is like extempore public speaking. The exact words you speak on a given day may vary from the previous day but it still requires a framework which needs to be rehearsed at home.( barring some exceptional cases ). Otherwise it will be a jumble of incoherent ideas not fitting together well. But given a well rehearsed framework, you can see a public speaker improvise on the fly. Why? Because that well rehearsed framework gives that person the confidence to improvise.

It may sound like a contracdition but it is true. For unbridled improvisation, you need a well rehearsed platform/grounding.
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rajeshnat
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#94

Post by rajeshnat » 13 May 2009, 20:44

vasanthakokilam wrote: One thing that many people do not seem to know is that manodharma aspects like kalpanaswarams are not entirely on the spot creativity. Kalpanaswarams require a lot of laya ability even more than swara ability ( contrary to what one may think intuitively ). Getting a great grounding in laya early on provides the fertilized platform on which the swara creativity can bloom later on. Strength in Laya gives you that confidence because that platform is not shaky so you do not mind standing on top of it, even jump up and down joyfully, even willy nilly, without any fear of falling.
Vk
Very well said especially I liked those 2 lines.
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cmlover
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#95

Post by cmlover » 13 May 2009, 21:29

Yes I agree Rajesh! VK simply sparkles. That indeed permits us to appreciate what Sarmaji is trying to explain perhaps in a circuitous language :) I see that his novelty is in training the student on Laya before starting anything. I have not heard the traditional music teachers adopting this approach. In the light of VK's explanation Sarmaji's approach is quite logical and it should work among very young learners.

I tested my layasense using the computer generted blips and aligned myself. Then I muted the sounds and tested my rhythm after two minutes and I was way off (which proves my total lack of laya sense!). I wish I were an eight-year old to learn Sarmaji's approach :)
Incidentally I tested some of the present day performers using the computer blip (on their videos (no names please!) and I found their laya sense also is lacking (eg., even adi thaaLaM). I noticed that the mridangist usually adjustas himself to accommodate the vocalist :) I do agree that Sarmaji's basic approach should be adopted by all CM teachers so that there is standardisation among future performers.

I applaud him on his lone crusade in the interest of CM!
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girish_a
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#96

Post by girish_a » 13 May 2009, 23:43

Mr. Manjunath, I find it very offensive when people talk derisively of others' works. There is nothing wrong in disagreeing with someone - indeed, it is very essential for a healthy exchange of ideas, and for ideas and concepts to mature; but put-downs and snide remarks make for a very distasteful experience.

Isn't it so much better to tell someone that you respectfully disagree and state the reasons than to use offensive language to make a point?

I have been reading Edward de Bono's "Serious Creativity" in which he mentions that it is more important to reward creative effort than just the results of creativity. I found this observation very practical.

If someone is trying to do something different, encourage them. They may fail, but they tried sincerely. If you don't find their work satisfactory, either help them improve it or move on if you aren't interested. But don't put people down.
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msakella
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#97

Post by msakella » 14 May 2009, 04:32

Dear brother-members, Rasika911, vasanthakokilam, rajeshnat, cmlover and girish_a, Thanks to all of you for your sincere efforts in supporting my novel methods of teaching

Vasanthakokilam’s observations "Kalpanaswarams require a lot of laya ability even more than swara ability ( contrary to what one may think intuitively ). Getting a great grounding in laya early on provides the fertilized platform on which the swara creativity can bloom later on. Strength in Laya gives you that confidence because that platform is not shaky so you do not mind standing on top of it, even jump up and down joyfully, even willy nilly, without any fear of falling"
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srikant1987
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#98

Post by srikant1987 » 14 May 2009, 06:30

Rasika911 wrote:The best way to sing an alapana for karaharapriya is to learn several krithis in it, there is no better proven way. Other methods dont require manodharmam and the student will be simply packaging without having any idea what they are singing.
Listening to several good alapanais, neravals and svarams is also a good way to learn what kharaharapriya really is, imho.
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msakella
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#99

Post by msakella » 14 May 2009, 07:57

Dear brother-member, srikant1987, All our stalwarts are mostly used to listen to all the Ragas while their Gurus were singing either mostly in their concerts or in their residences occassionally and, in turn, they are also always used to tell the same even to their disciples that they must listen more to their singing and sing later. Most unfortunately, all the stalwarts are always used to tell that always it is healthy to listen to their Guru and learn only in person but not by notation or pre-recorded music of cassette or CD. That is why only a very few Gamakas have been symbolised even in our great Sangita Sampradaya Pradhashini of Subbarama Dikshitar. In general, in any country and in any walk of life, the elders are always used to strive hard in making things easier to their kids of future generations and I also feel the same in respect of all our stalwarts who did never care to evolve a flawless system of writing notation not only to make things easier to their kids but also for proper documentation of the available material. Unlike any other stalwart, being a very little artist, only keeping this in view, I have strived hard to bring out 60 varieties of symbolised Kampitas and Gamakas in my book, Sangita Svararaga Sudha and AMS Easy Methods-2007 CD. In this respect I have also brought out 27 facets of Kaishiki-nishada alone in my above CD. All these things I did only as a start for doing such things but not to earn money or recognition or fame or titles or awards at all. Even though few people think that I never produce even a single disciple my disciples always shine far above many of their contemporaries as I always take every care in shaping them as a replicas of mine even without expecting any monetary benefit from any one of them.

In which way we train our kids to take out the ghee out of the milk, if the music-aspirants are also trained how to take out the element of Raga from the Varna or Kriti through the detailed knowledge of symbolised Kampitas and Gamakas it becomes easier to the aspirant to make Ragalapana also efficiently on his own. I always respect the stalwarts or teachers who strive hard sincerely and honestly in shaping their students just as their replicas. amsharma
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cmlover
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#100

Post by cmlover » 14 May 2009, 09:57

You make lot of sense Sarmaji. Listening to one's guru or listening to stalwarts will make a student simply just imitative. On the otherhand your approach is analytic which will make them creative. Do give site references to your student's performances available on the net so that we can listen and assess their creativity in swarakalpana as welll as aalaapana.
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